How to Choose the Right Countertops for Your Kitchen Remodel

How to Choose the Right Countertops for Your Kitchen Remodel | The Diary of a DIYer

Remodeling your kitchen is a big undertaking. It requires a lot of planning and smart decision making to create a functional space where you can cook comfortably while spending time with family.

Choosing countertops can be a bit of a challenge and brings up a few questions. What’s right for your kitchen? What’s right for you and your family? Keep reading to learn how to choose the right countertops for your kitchen remodel.

Materials

Granite and quartz countertop samples

Granite

Over the years, granite countertops have remained a popular choice among homeowners. With many options for colors and patterns, granite countertops offer a truly unique look – no two pieces will look the same. These natural stone counters hold up well to scratches and heat but need yearly sealing to protect them from the day to day elements of a working kitchen.

Ideal for: homeowners with classic and traditional styles

Quartz

Engineered quartz countertops are some of the most durable and sanitary surfaces you can install in a kitchen. The physical make-up is about 95% ground natural quartz and 5% polymer resin. Translation: the quartz makes these counters incredibly strong and the resin prevents stains and scratches.

Homeowners love these counters because they’re low maintenance and have an array of colors that aren’t available in other stone options. Price-wise, quartz is on par with granite per square foot.

Ideal for: homeowners looking for a countertop that’ll hold up for years to come

Butcher Block

For homeowners in love with the current farmhouse trend, butcher block countertops are almost necessary. These counters are a warm alternative to the coldness of stone and stainless steel options. Butcher block definitely adds a relaxed feel to any kitchen. The downside is that, because these are made from wood, they’re highly susceptible to water damage.

Ideal for: farmhouse, rustic and traditional kitchens

Stainless Steel

There’s a reason why commercial kitchens use stainless steel everywhere – workspaces, sinks, appliances, you name it. Besides offering a sleek, contemporary look, stainless steel counters also resist heat, stains and bacteria growth. This material tends to scratch and dent easily, so if you’re the clumsy type or have young children, stainless steel countertops might not be the right pick for your kitchen.

Ideal for: serious chefs who love industrial or transitional décor

Marble

No one can deny the effortlessly classic look marble countertops add to a kitchen. In order for them to stay beautiful, there’s a bit of work that goes into upkeep. Since marble is a softer stone, it’s prone to staining and etching. Common acidic ingredients like lemon juice or tomatoes can create dull spots on the counter but will blend in over time. A potential bonus? Marble counters are a great workspace, especially if you’re big into baking.

Ideal for: remodelers looking for classic style with a modern, minimal twist

Laminate

Replacing old laminate countertops with new laminate countertops seems kind of counterintuitive, right? Hear me out.

Laminate counters have come a long way since they made their way onto the scene. So if you’re remodeling a kitchen from decades ago, you might be surprised what strides it’s made. Laminate countertops can mimic the look of granite, marble and wood at a fraction of the cost. On the flipside, laminate is hard to repair if it gets damaged.

Ideal for: budget remodelers

Installation

When it comes to installing new kitchen countertops, I would generally lean toward calling in a pro to take care of the dirty work. This rings true especially for stone counters like granite and quartz. The weight alone is enough to have a team of professionals come in for installation.

That’s not to say home improvement DIYers can’t tackle their own countertop installation during a remodel. In fact, I’ve read about other bloggers installing their own butcher block, concrete and laminate countertops. But if there’s any doubt in your mind, call in a professional contractor to help you out.

Need more guidance? Check out Porch.com’s article about this very topic here.

With all the available countertop options, choosing just one for your kitchen remodel is a big decision to make. One good thing about choosing a countertop is that you can mix and match materials to make your kitchen one-of-a-kind. For example, you can install butcher block as an accent on the island and use marble throughout the rest of the kitchen.

Are you planning a kitchen remodel this year? Let me know what kind of exciting changes you’re making in the comments!